Why Johnny can’t X

David Brin, “Why Johnny Can’t Code,” Salon (2006)

Mike Davidow, Why Johnny Can’t Read and Ivan Can (1977)

Tommy Dreyfus, “Why Johnny Can’t Prove,” Educational Studies in Mathematics (1999)

Rudolf Flesch, Why Johnny Can’t Read (1955) and Why Johnny Still Can’t Read (1981)

Thomas Frank, “Dark Age: Why Johnny Can’t Dissent,” The Baffler (1995)

Konstantin Kakaes, “Why Johnny Can’t Add Without a Calculator,” Salon (2012)

Walter Karp, “Why Johnny Can’t Think,” Harper’s (1985)

William Kilpatrick, Why Johnny Can’t Tell Right from Wrong (1992)

Morris Kline, Why Johnny Can’t Add: The Failure of the New Math (1974)

Myra Linden and Arthur Whimbey, Why Johnny Can’t Write (2012)

Opal Moore, Why Johnny Can’t Learn (1975)

Douglas Rushkoff, “Why Johnny Can’t Program,” Huffington Post (2010)

Arthur Trace, What Ivan Knows that Johnny Doesn’t (1961)

Energies and perseverances

Thomas Jefferson to Dr. John P. Emmet, May 2, 1826, discovered in Nathaniel Grossman, The Sheer Joy of Celestial Mechanics:

[…] consider that we do not expect our schools to turn out their alumni already on the pinnacles of their respective sciences; but only so far advanced in each as to be able to pursue them by themselves, and to become Newtons and Laplaces by energies and perseverances to be continued throughout life.

The shadow of lost knowledge

William Johnson Cory in Eton Reform II as adapted by George Lyttleton in writing to Rupert Hart-Davis, discovered in a piece by David Bromwich on free speech and the university:

At school you are engaged not so much in acquiring knowledge as in making mental efforts under criticism. A certain amount of knowledge you can indeed with average faculties acquire so as to retain; nor need you regret the hours you spent on much that is forgotten, for the shadow of lost knowledge at least protects you from many illusions. But you go to a great school not so much for knowledge as for arts and habits; for the habit of attention, for the art of expression, for the art of assuming at a moment’s notice a new intellectual position, for the art of entering quickly into another person’s thoughts, for the habit of submitting to censure and refutation, for the art of indicating assent or dissent in graduated terms, for the habit of regarding minute points of accuracy, for the art of working out what is possible in a given time, for taste, for discrimination, for mental courage, and for mental soberness.